Book review
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Martínez-Cardama, S., & García -López, F. (2022). Book review: Wiggins, Bradley E. (2019). The Discursive Power of Memes in Digital Culture Ideology: Semiotics, and Intertextuality. New York: Routledge. The European Journal of Humour Research, 10(2), 170–173. Retrieved from https://www.europeanjournalofhumour.org/ejhr/article/view/666

Abstract

Book review

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References

Althusser, L. (2006). ‘Ideology and ideological state apparatuses (Notes toward an investigation)’, in M. G. Durham & D. M. Kellner (Eds.), Media and Cultural Studies: Keyworks. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 79–87.

Barthes, R. (1977). Image-Music-Text. London: Fontana.

Dawkins, R. (1989). The Selfish Gene. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Foucault, M. (1989). The Archaeology of Knowledge. London: Routledge.

Giddens, A. (1984). The Constitution of Society: Outline of the Theory of Structure. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Hall, S. (2012). ‘Encoding/decoding’, in Durham, M. G. & Kellner, D. M. (eds.), Media and Cultural Studies: Keyworks. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 137–144.

Shifman, L. (2013). ‘Memes in a digital world: Reconciling with a conceptual troublemaker’. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 18, pp.362–377.

Snyder, T. (2018). The Road to Unfreedom: Russia, Europe, America. London: Penguin Random House.

Wiggins, Bradley E (2019). The Discursive Power of Memes in Digital Culture: Ideology, Semiotics, and Intertextuality. New York: Routledge.

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